He Kept This SECRET From Her Until Their Wedding Day. You Will NOT Believe What He Did… OMG!

How did he manage to keep a secret like that for so long!?

At pretty much all of the wedding receptions that I’ve been to, I prepare for some seriously awkward dance moves once the music gets going. But Sean Rajaee had an incredible surprise for his bride, Ariana. But what kind of surprise? The super groovy kind. Sean took some of Ariana’s favourite songs and gave her a performance that she would never forget. [googlead]How did it turn out? You be the judge.

Some of the groomsmen learned the routine last-minute via video tutorial. Impressive, to say the least!

She Was Always Too Afraid To Ride A Plane. But She Faced Her Fear At 71. Amazing!

Her reaction is so incredible because it’s so genuine. I love it!

When you stop and think about it, air travel is pretty incredible. I mean, you’re travelling across the planet via a gigantic flying machine. While many of us will book a flight and hop on board a plane without hestitation, others haven’t quite come to terms with this mode of transportation. [googlead]Meet An and Ria, two lovely ladies who haven never flown before. But that’s about to change. Watch as their beautifully heartwarming adventure unfolds.

I absolutely love their reaction. It really inspires you to take a step back and look at all the wonderful experiences we have in life that we take for granted. And here’s some bonus footage of Nan on a roller coaster, preparing for her first flight!

Scientists Are Freaking Out Over This Smart Girl’s Solution To Superbugs

This is a major breakthrough! 😀

At the young age of 25, Shu Lam has made one of the most important medical discoveries of our time. Shu is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne and she has developed a way to destroy superbugs without using antibiotics. Why is this such a big deal? Time for a quick history lesson…

Back in 1928, bacteriologist Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, the first true antibiotic. He was observing his culture plates of disease-causing bacteria when he noticed spores of green mold. Incredibly, this mold was killing and preventing the growth of the bacteria. It was a major breakthrough that revolutionized medicine, helping the world to treat disease worldwide.

Unfortunately, antibiotics were so effective and so accessible that they were overused, particularly with livestock. This led bacteria to develop a resistance against antibiotics. It became a sort of cat-and-mouse game with scientists coming up with new antibiotics and bacteria mutating to become resistant against its latest threat. And thus, “superbugs” were born… bacteria that are resistant to almost anything we can throw at it. That is, until now.

Instead of using an antibiotic, Shu developed a large molecule known as a polymer. Instead of attacking superbugs chemically, like an antibiotic, the polymer attacks them physically. Shu’s star-shaped polymer tear into the surface of the bacteria’s membrane, causing it to kill itself. It does all of this while leaving the healthy cells undisturbed.

Shu’s research is still in the very early stages and a lot of work still needs to be done before human testing can begin. Regardless, this is incredible news that can save millions of lives!

Cook County inmates call new jail recording studio “a blessing”; officials hope it reduces recidivism

Just eight classes into a music education course at Cook County Jail, inmate D’Andre Morris already looked like a professional. Using an Apple computer connected to two subwoofers, Morris deftly cut and blended musical tracks at a new recording studio built in the basement of the jail’s medium-maximum Division 11.

Long interested in songwriting and music production, Morris said he’s never worked on professional sound equipment like the kind inside the studio locked behind a large green metal door with a single square window. Morris, who’s spent more than a year behind bars awaiting trial on an attempted murder charge, said he’s grateful to be learning the technical aspects of sound engineering, even if he regrets that it took a stint in jail for this opportunity.

“It’s a blessing,” said Morris of the freshly painted 33-by-25-foot cinder block storage room, the result of fundraising efforts by local musician Antony Ablan.

As Morris adjusted sound levels at Ablan’s gentle instruction, four other young men — also dressed in the tan jail jumpsuit and from different parts of the Chicago area — sat in a semicircle behind them. They laughed and chatted about their new song titled “Choices,” scribbling down lyrics or shortcut keys for the sound-editing software in their notepads.

In Chicago, where scores of young men, some with ties to gangs and violent drug-selling cliques, dream of reaching rap music stardom, Ablan and others believe the music studio could be a new approach to keep inmates mentally engaged.

“Something like this (doesn’t) happen” Morris said. “It’s just unheard of, being in jail and being able to learn to engineer and produce and learn how to play different instruments. And just to be able to do something that’s fun. It’s pretty cool and a great experience.”

Ablan’s studio isn’t the only recording studio inside a jail facility: The Richmond City Jail in Virginia has had a small studio since 2013, along with two prisons, the East Jersey State Prison in New Jersey and Halden Prison in Norway. And supporters of Ablan’s efforts — Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart among them — believe the studio could offer specialized training to young men at a critical time.

Job training for young men is an important factor in fighting jail recidivism, jail officials said. While the state of black employment for men ages 20 to 24 in Chicago has improved recently, the number of men who are unemployed and not in school remains stubbornly high at 37 percent, according to the Great Cities Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

“When you look at every study that’s ever been done, it all comes back to the same thing,” said Dart, who OK’d Ablan’s proposal. “If you give people opportunities for legitimate jobs and careers, they more likely than other folks will avoid the criminal justice system.”

The basement studio is next to a state-of-the-art kitchen and art studio all set up by Chef Bruno Abate, whose “Recipe for Change” initiative at the jail has tutored detainees in food preparation and art skills. Food, music and art are staples of life, according to Abate, who mentored Ablan and is credited by Dart with helping turn around the lives of some inmates.

“At the end of the day, what we all want is that you guys don’t come back here,” Abate told the detainees during a recent visit.

Through a crowdsourcing campaign last fall, Ablan raised more than $12,000 to foot the bill for constructing the studio and attracted other musicians and instrument companies that donated equipment. Soon, Ablan hopes to expand the course from two days to five days. If the expansion continues, Ablan’s program could grow to include female detainees. Currently, he’s hoping to gather other music professionals to volunteer their time to mentor his students. “I’d like for this to be the best music program in the country. Never mind that it’s in a jail,” he said.

Inmates interested in Ablan’s program had to fill out a questionnaire gauging their interest in learning about music. His selections were passed along to jail officials, who weeded out those with troubled backgrounds while in jail, though facing violent charges didn’t necessarily disqualify applicants, officials said.

But making music is only part of the goal of the program. It aims to help detainees sort through their own personal struggles using the creative songwriting process. Their song “Choices,” for example, came about after a simple in-class chat about Chicago rapper Kanye West’s support of President Donald Trump spurred a very personal hourslong exchange about the choices one makes in life.

While technical instruction is important, the class also reinforces skills for dealing with tough situations, said Erik Roberts, an education liaison between Chicago Public Schools and the county jail, who aids Ablan in the course.

“Many of the people here have talents, but they don’t have a tangible way to get there. We’re also teaching life skills at this class,” he said.

Roberts, who was recruited as an educator in the program, is himself a rapper known as Sycosis and has produced and performed raps since his high school days as a way of coping with his own father’s imprisonment. In the class, Roberts patiently listens to the inmates’ ideas while offering his own lyric and sound ideas.

It’s unclear whether the public will ever get to hear the detainees’ music, though they and Ablan remain hopeful that they will be able to post their completed songs on a music-hosting site like SoundCloud.

For Marco Martinez, the studio offers a much needed diversion from the monotony and loneliness that can come with jail. But writing lyrics has also offered a chance for Martinez, a Blue Island resident in custody the last four years on an attempted murder charge, to calm his wild youthful spirit and channel his thoughts in a positive way.

“I wanna learn myself — I wanna learn my purpose,” Martinez said. “I’m still trying to find myself just because I’ve been incarcerated since I was 17. I was living life real quick, so to be able to sit down and actually analyze my thoughts and be able to see the potential that I actually have as a person, it’s a really good accomplishment for myself.”

The youngest of the group at 20, Martinez has used his love for corrido, a popular type of Mexican band music that relies on poetic narrative, to help find his voice within the class while relieving the stress of being locked away and judged by others.

“Really, me being in here for four years, especially being a (maximum-security) inmate, we’re not really exposed to too much programming because of the situation that we’re facing, and a lot of people look at us way different,” he said.

New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern and her partner name their baby daughter after the Maori word for love

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and her partner Clarke Gayford have introduced the public to her daughter and revealed the newborn’s name.

The beaming pair greeted media on Sunday for the first time since arriving at Auckland Hospital on Thursday.

Ms Ardern began by announcing the baby would be called Neve Te Aroha Ardern Gayford — or Neve Gayford for short.

“When we met her we thought she looked like she suited the name,” she said.

“Also it means, in various forms, bright and radiant and snow, which seemed like a good combination for Matariki (Maori new year) and for solstice.”

Aroha in Maori means love and Te Aroha is also the name of a mountain near where Ms Ardern’s family come from.

“Te Aroha was our way of reflecting the amount of love this baby has been shown before she arrived and all of the names we were gifted along the way [by various iwi — or tribes],” Ms Ardern said.

She and Mr Gayford had opted to spell the name Neve — as opposed to Niamh for example — for simplicity, with Ms Ardern joking about the unusual spellings of Clarke and Jacinda.

The couple also described the first moment they met Neve.

“I won’t forget the look on Jacinda’s face when she finally held the baby,” Mr Gayford said.

Since the birth on Thursday, Ms Ardern has received messages from world leaders, including the Queen, as well as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — who sent a handwritten note saying they looked forward to meeting later in the year.

“As equally special to us were just those people who took time to send a little note, or a blanket or a set of booties,” Ms Ardern said.

The family will now leave the hospital to spend a stint at home and away from the spotlight.

“Over the next six weeks we’ll do what every other parent does and learn the little nuances … and just figure things out as we go.”

Before leaving the hospital, Ms Ardern recorded a personal video, with a sleeping Neve in her arms that was posted on her Facebook page, to say “thanks, from the bottom of our hearts” for all the messages and comments they have received.

She also again praised the staff at the hospital for the care, advice and support she received during their hospital stay.

“We couldn’t have had a better start,” she said.

Ms Ardern has become the first elected world leader to take maternity leave, but for the next six weeks will still be on call for major government issues.

Mr Gayford will be the child’s primary carer once the PM returns to parliament.

“I hope for little girls and boys there’s a future where they can make choices about how they raise their family and what kind of career they have based on what they want.”

New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern and her partner name their baby daughter after the Maori word for love

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and her partner Clarke Gayford have introduced the public to her daughter and revealed the newborn’s name.

The beaming pair greeted media on Sunday for the first time since arriving at Auckland Hospital on Thursday.

Ms Ardern began by announcing the baby would be called Neve Te Aroha Ardern Gayford — or Neve Gayford for short.

“When we met her we thought she looked like she suited the name,” she said.

“Also it means, in various forms, bright and radiant and snow, which seemed like a good combination for Matariki (Maori new year) and for solstice.”

Aroha in Maori means love and Te Aroha is also the name of a mountain near where Ms Ardern’s family come from.

“Te Aroha was our way of reflecting the amount of love this baby has been shown before she arrived and all of the names we were gifted along the way [by various iwi — or tribes],” Ms Ardern said.

She and Mr Gayford had opted to spell the name Neve — as opposed to Niamh for example — for simplicity, with Ms Ardern joking about the unusual spellings of Clarke and Jacinda.

The couple also described the first moment they met Neve.

“I won’t forget the look on Jacinda’s face when she finally held the baby,” Mr Gayford said.

Since the birth on Thursday, Ms Ardern has received messages from world leaders, including the Queen, as well as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex — who sent a handwritten note saying they looked forward to meeting later in the year.

“As equally special to us were just those people who took time to send a little note, or a blanket or a set of booties,” Ms Ardern said.

The family will now leave the hospital to spend a stint at home and away from the spotlight.

“Over the next six weeks we’ll do what every other parent does and learn the little nuances … and just figure things out as we go.”

Before leaving the hospital, Ms Ardern recorded a personal video, with a sleeping Neve in her arms that was posted on her Facebook page, to say “thanks, from the bottom of our hearts” for all the messages and comments they have received.

She also again praised the staff at the hospital for the care, advice and support she received during their hospital stay.

“We couldn’t have had a better start,” she said.

Ms Ardern has become the first elected world leader to take maternity leave, but for the next six weeks will still be on call for major government issues.

Mr Gayford will be the child’s primary carer once the PM returns to parliament.

“I hope for little girls and boys there’s a future where they can make choices about how they raise their family and what kind of career they have based on what they want.”

Sam Adams teams to support veteran-owned small businesses

Sword Plough co-founders Emily Nunez Cavness and Betsy Nunez on how their small business’ product line and how it is giving back to veterans.

Samuel Adams founder Jim Koch knows a few things about what it takes to become a successful businessman, and that’s exactly why he’s giving back to American military veteran entrepreneurs.
Through the company’s Brewing the American Dream philanthropy program, veteran-owned small businesses in the food and beverage industries will be provided with aid via a partnership with the StreetShares Foundation, a nonprofit whose mission is to provide “inspirational success stories, educational content, or awards that provide a boost of financial support” for veterans to grow their business.
The partnership offers veteran small business owners — who held a majority stake in more than 2.5 million businesses in the U.S. in 2012 — education and capital, including $100,000 toward grants, free educational events, mentoring and resources, as well as the popular “Speed Coaching” events where vets will receive one-on-one help from business experts.
“Veterans are some of the best entrepreneurs,” Koch, who prefers to use the term “vetrepreneurs,” told FOX Business. “I think the statistics … [show] that they are more entrepreneurial than regular civilians. And when they start a business they tend to outearn and be more successful than regular civilian entrepreneurs.”
In another nod to helping veterans, 50 cents of every 12-pack of Sam Adams Boston Lager sold will be donated to the StreetShares Foundation to fund business grants and mentoring for veteran-owned businesses at participating locations until July 5. Businesses can receive up to $150,000.
Drinkers can also text to donate to StreetShares and the brewery will match the donation dollar for dollar, up to $20,000.

Bancor to Help Reduce Poverty in Kenya With Community Currencies

Bancor, the decentralized liquidity platform, has announced that it will release a new service aimed at decreasing the poverty in Kenya. Bancor will be helping Kenyans to grow the wealth of their local area through the creation of ‘Community Currencies.’

Community Currencies are a type of financial system where people are encouraged to use a local currency which facilitates transactions through the blockchain. In a statement, Galia Benartzi, co-founder of Bancor, said that the service aims to ‘create wealth on a local level’ as well as ‘fill regional trade gaps, enable basic income and food security, and promote thriving local and interconnected global markets.’

Community Currencies are created by individual people and can be traded for other blockchain based currencies without any third-party involvement. This is possible because the Bancor network avoids the necessity for counterparties. This aspect helps to further stimulate financial growth by making trades fast and easy.

To support the creation of the initial Community Currencies, Bancor will be using a portion of the $153 Million they raised in 2017.

The company has teamed up with the non-profit organization, Grassroots Economics, to aid in the design and creation of the service. Grassroots Economics already run several other community currency programs around Kenya. They will be helping to set Bancor’s system up in both Kawangware and Kibera— two financially vulnerable locations.

This intervention by Bancor follows the World Bank’s Findex report, which found that around three billion individuals in the world are underbanked and cannot find any viable type of financial support. Organisations and charities are only now beginning to recognize that cryptocurrency could bridge this gap and potentially free citizens from their financial burdens.

Another cryptocurrency which has been focusing its efforts on the underbanked is the privacy coin, DASH. The team has been aiming to get countries like Venezuela and Zimbabwe to adopt their coin, considering how residents of both regions cannot comfortably rely on their respective fiat currencies.

Weekend Watch: Wood Turning with Caitlan the Cat

It’s always inspiring to see talented young people sharing their projects on YouTube and using the platform as a way of gaining knowledge, getting feedback and advice, and plugging into a wider community. Caitlan Davis, aka Caitlan the Cat, is a 13 year old wood turner from Yorkshire, England.

On her channel, which has been around for under a year and currently has just over 500 subscribers, Caitlan shows off her turning projects and records the process of her turning them. Her enthusiasm and self-confidence is infectious and it’s heartwarming to see all of the positive and supportive comments she gets and gentle advice that people offer.

Caitlan has posted 30 videos so far. Here is a sampling.

Japanese soccer fans take the time to clean up stadium after world cup win

Japan’s courteous soccer fans made sure the only things left in the stadium from Tuesday’s stunning World Cup victory over Colombia were the numbers on the scoreboard.

They drew praise for taking the time to clean up after themselves following the team’s 2-1 victory, combing the aisles for garbage to throw into blue trash bags they had brought themselves to 44,000-seat Mordovia Arena in Russia.

The victory marked the first time a team from Asia has ever beaten a team from soccer-mad South America in the World Cup, but cleaning up afterward was not a first-time experience for Japan’s fans.

They have showed in the past that even a loss won’t prevent them from courteous behavior, as they did the same thing after losing 2-1 to Ivory Coast in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

Their good deed didn’t go unnoticed on Tuesday, as World Cup fans were impressed with the good manners of Japan’s supporters.

Their cleanliness also appears to be contagious, as Senegal’s fans followed in a later game by picking up after themselves when they were done celebrating a 2-1 win over Poland.

Hopefully this becomes a new World Cup tradition. Clean up the opponent on the field, and then do the same in the stands.